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Lady Barbara Judge CBE visited various places in Fukushima and spoke with local residents.

 

Lady Barbara Judge CBE visited various places in Fukushima with Professor Gerry Thomas (Imperial College London and Director of Chernobyl Tissue Bank, U.K.) from August 4th to 5th, 2014, and spoke mainly with local women, to ensure that they have accurate knowledge on radiation.

 

They participated in the local symposium about thyroid screening tests held at “Ryozen Satoyama School” in Ryozen Town, Date City, Fukushima Prefecture on the evening of August 4th. Professor Gerry Thomas explained about the effects of radiation and the results of a thyroid screening test in a manner that the residents could readily understand. They communicated with the residents to relieve their anxiety by giving them correct information.

Mr. Sakurai held a meeting with TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Special Task Force on July 17, 2014.

  • Mr. Sakurai received explanations on the progress of TEPCO's Nuclear Safety Reform Plan from TEPCO's Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.
  • With regard to emergency drills, he advised TEPCO to consider how best to set priorities for the information from each section and how to visualize their level of importance (such as color coding), so that executives can make composed, measured judgments during an emergency.

Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) held a meeting with the Fukushima Daiichi Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on July 17, 2014.

  • Mr. Barrett received explanations on the Water Management Plan and the root cause analysis of the Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS) issues.

Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) held a follow-up seminar on management procedure for the executives of TEPCO’s Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on July 16, 2014.

    Mr. Barrett’s main points of advice are as below:
  • If a problem arises, determine its cause and solve it with the entire team, including contractors.
  • Discuss what is the best option constantly, because sometimes, a backup plan may end up becoming the best option, and make decisions with the team.

Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) inspected Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on July 15, 2014.

  • Mr. Barrett received reports from TEPCO staff on measures for contaminated water (ALPS, Groundwater Bypass, Ice Wall, etc.) and conducted an on-site inspection.

Mr. Barrett (Decommissioning member) visited various places in Fukushima and spoke with local residents.

Mr. Barrett visited various places in Fukushima with his wife, Lynn, and grand-daughter, Jessica, and spoke with local residents from May 26th to 28th, 2014. He related his family’s experience of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident (they lived near the TMI nuclear power plant for three years following the accident) in order to contribute to the reconstruction of Fukushima.

 

CREATING A FUTURE FOR FUKUSHIMA’S PEOPLE

By Lake H. Barrett

 

In all the attention that’s being given to the very real technical challenges being faced in the cleanup of the nuclear accident at Fukushima, it has been too easy to forget about the people who live there.

 

But I know what it’s like to live in the shadow of an accident at a nuclear power plant. In 1980, when I was a young government official, I moved my wife and two young sons to Central Pennsylvania, near the Three Mile Island facility, when I was given a leading role in managing its cleanup. While the two situations are not identical, and the Fukushima event is more complex and will take longer to remediate, there are important psychological parallels for the people who live nearby: the anxiety, the unknowns, and the nagging feeling that they are being used as pawns in political and policy battles over the future of nuclear energy.

 

My past visits to Japan, in the capacity of a technical adviser to the Fukushima plant’s owner, the Tokyo Electric Power Company, focused on the cleanup technical challenges. But when I went in May I went for a different reason: to connect with the people who have been affected, some of whom have been evacuated, and to bring them three things they need more of: accurate technical information, compassion, and a vision for a future of their communities.

 

My wife Lynn and granddaughter Jessica accompanied me. The people we met in the small, primarily agricultural towns near the Fukushima Daiichi plant impressed us with their sophisticated questions, and humbled us with their resilience and determination. Hearing their stories rekindled vivid memories of what we experienced 34 years ago at Three Mile Island. Lynn, who at the time was a childbirth nurse in the local hospital, shared the concerns of many mothers. And although Jessica wasn’t yet born in 1980, her father grew up and went to school near the shadow of the Three Mile Island cooling towers.

 

Before sharing more about what we heard, a quick geography lesson: The Fukushima Daiichi plant is located on the coast, and nearby are mostly small agricultural communities such as Hirono, Tomioka, and others. The plume of radioactive contamination released at the time of the accident ran generally to the northwest, affecting individual communities differently. Some residents are in the process of being resettled after full or partial evacuations. Others, like the residents of Soma City, live just outside the evacuation zone. All the residents, whether evacuated or not, also had to contend with the effects the Great Japan Earthquake that generated the tsunami and destroyed or damaged thousands of their homes.

 

Mothers, Grandmothers

 

One of our meetings was with a group of women from those towns. They were mothers, grandmothers, and expectant mothers. Like mothers anywhere, they are concerned for their children, and they are hungry for real information. Many feel that, despite TEPCO’s and the government’s efforts, they aren’t getting enough, at least not enough to counter anti-nuclear activists’ scare tactics. In fact, these people who bore the brunt of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident are now being hurt a fourth time by those whose agenda is served by portraying the residents as perpetual victims.

 

They asked me whether their children will be safe from radiation if they move back to their homes from the places to which they’d been evacuated. And they will. We know more about the carcinogenic effects of radiation than the effects of almost anything else, and it’s clear the exposure levels will be safe.

 

They also need information to counter questions – and stand up to guilt trips – from people who say that things like, “How can you possibly go back?” Or, “Your children are radioactive and can’t play with my children.” My family endured these same types of comments when we lived near Three Mile Island.

 

Farmers and Fishermen

 

I also met with rice farmers and fishermen, who asked reasonable, well-informed questions. They wanted to know where the contaminated soil removed from their towns will be deposited. The rice farmer wanted to know if his rice fields will become more contaminated by water flowing down the mountains. It won’t, partly because whatever was deposited in the soil three years ago is already decaying substantially and will continue to do so. Fisherman worried that even though their fish is rigorously tested and proven safe; there is a stigma to the name Fukushima that will discourage purchasers. These same unfortunate questions burdened the good farmers near Three Mile Island, however they faded with time as the public recognized the quality and safety of the Central Pennsylvania food products.

 

Others find themselves unable to fish at all, excluded from fishing in their traditional waters and equally excluded from encroaching onto fishing grounds long claimed by other fishing cooperatives. Surely a solution can be found that respects Japanese fishing traditions while doing something to ensure a future for these resilient people whose culture and economy are so closely linked to the sea.

 

Diligent monitoring, along with significant improvements in the control of contaminated water at the plant will protect the sea and make clear that the fish from the area’s waters are safe. My family and I ate local seafood without any concerns about its safety.

 

The Need for Hope

 

In the three years since the accident, when it comes to victims the focus has understandably been primarily on compensating them financially. But it is clear to me that proactive outreach from the government, TEPCO, and others are essential to address their need for information and emotional support. TEPCO has undertaken a long-term commitment to support the revitalization of the Fukushima area, and I urge them to include these kinds of outreach as part of that revitalization effort.

 

More than anything, the people of the communities affected by the Fukushima accident need hope. They need to believe that their rice fields will flourish again, their schools and workplaces will come back to life, and that their communities – in which many have lived for generations – have a future.

 

Hearing this from someone who had personally experienced Three Mile Island seemed to help. But it is not enough. A concerted outreach effort to the people of these communities, done in a way that respects Japanese culture and sensibilities, is essential if these determined but anxious people are to regain their confidence and their vision of a safe, prosperous, and happy future.

Dr.Klein mourns remembered Ambassador Haward Baker

NUCLEAR REFORM COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN KLEIN MOURNS BAKER;
NOTES HIS SUPPORT FOR JAPAN, AND FOR NUCLEAR ENERGY



June 30, 2014
Dr. Dale Klein

Dr. Dale Klein, the former head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission who currently chairs TEPCO's Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, today remembered Ambassador Howard Baker as a great friend to Japan and a supporter of nuclear energy.

 

Baker, who in addition to his role as U.S. Ambassador to Japan was a U.S. Senator from Tennessee, Majority Leader, and served as White House chief of staff under President Ronald Reagan, died June 26 at age 88.

 

Observed Dr. Klein: "Although most people justly remember then-Senator Baker for his gift at conciliation and great leadership, I was privileged to see him bring the same great personal qualities to other aspects of his public life. As Ambassador to Japan from 2001 to 2005, he represented our country with distinction and strengthened our relationship with Japan not only as a strategic ally, but as a people for whom he developed a great affection."

 

Dr. Klein also noted that Senator Baker believed in the importance of nuclear power as part of the strategy of both our countries to achieve energy security. The Howard Baker Forum (howardbakerforum.org) has, in fact, played a role in educating the public about nuclear energy and counteracting the misinformation that has followed the accident at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant.

 

The Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee that Dr. Klein chairs is a group of international experts formed to advise the plant's owner, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., on the efforts to reform nuclear safety culture and to decontaminate and decommission the Fukushima Daiichi facility.

 

"I believe Howard Baker was one of the best ambassadors we ever sent to Japan," Dr. Klein said, "because he understood that people, not politics, made the difference."

 

On behalf of the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, we extend our condolences to his wife, Mrs. Nancy Kassebaum Baker, and to his many friends in the U.S. and Japan.

Mr. Sakurai inspected a TEPCO emergency drill on June 11, 2014.

  • Mr. Sakurai inspected an emergency drill at TEPCO Emergency Response Headquarters, held with Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.
  • He commented, “It is necessary to ascertain whether any injuries have occurred, including those to partners working in the plant” and, “When you provide information externally, I’d like you to provide what those receiving it want to know, such as information on the discharge of contaminated water and whether any damage has occurred when removing fuel at Unit 4.”

Dr. Dale Klein and Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) held a meeting with the Fukushima Daiichi Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on May 2, 2014.

  • Dr. Klein and Mr. Barrett exchanged opinions on the formulation of the comprehensive and integrated water management plan.

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting with TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Office on April 30, 2014.

  • Lady Judge received explanations on the status of activities of TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Office.
  • Lady Judge commented that TEPCO needs to change its culture even more, from one emphasizing efficiency to one emphasizing safety, by showing examples of vehicles making abnormal noises and airplane speakers breaking.

Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) held a seminar on management procedure for the executives of TEPCO’s Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on April 30, 2014, based on his experience dealing with the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI).

    Mr. Barrett’s main points of advice are as below:
  • The important thing is “teamwork”.
  • Managers have the responsibility to create vertical relationships, so that all workers from top to bottom can share a common recognition.
  • Managers also have the responsibility to create horizontal relationships with outside entities whose involvement has, until now, been limited (such as those related to national defense and robotic development).

Mr. Lake Barrett held a meeting with the Fukushima Daiichi Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on April 29, 2014.

  • Mr. Barrett received explanations on the status of TEPCO’s activities based on advice which it was given in the telephone conference on April 4, and the water management plan.

Mr. Sakurai held a meeting with TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Special Task Force on April 22, 2014.

  • Mr. Sakurai received explanations on the progress of TEPCO's Nuclear Safety Reform Plan from TEPCO's Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

Dr. Dale Klein and Mr. Lake Barrett (Decommissioning member) held a telephone conference with the Fukushima Daiichi Decontamination & Decommissioning Engineering Company on April 4, 2014.

  • Dr. Klein and Mr. Barrett received explanations on the Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS) and the operating method of the groundwater bypass.
  • Dr. Klein and Mr. Barrett advised, “It is important to hold reviews by external specialists and organizations.”

Mr. Sakurai held a meeting with TEPCO’s Social Communication Office on April 4, 2014.

  • Mr. Sakurai received explanations on the Social Communication Office’s 2013 performance and future plans from its executives.
  • Mr. Sakurai advised, “When problems occur that you cannot fully elucidate even after investigation of the causes, it is important how you convey this information, thinking from the standpoint of the people who will hear it.”

Mr. Sakurai inspected a TEPCO emergency drill on March 18, 2014.

  • Mr. Sakurai inspected an emergency drill at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station held with TEPCO’s headquarters.
  • He commented, “The results of the drill highlighted that items need to be improved, such as the fact that outsiders couldn’t understand the terms used. I’d like you to undertake a number of joint drills with external parties, and test whether you can cooperate properly.”

Mr. Sakurai, a member of the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, discussed with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force on March 14, 2014.

    The main themes of the discussion were as follows:
  • The training plan that would be conducted at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station.
  • Causes of and countermeasures for recent trouble at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.
  • Goal management of Nuclear Safety Reform.
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Dr. Dale Klein discussed how to inculcate safety culture into the organization etc. with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force on March 11, 2014.

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On March 11, 2014, Dr. Dale Klein observed silence at 14:46 on the third anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake. He then listened to speeches by the President of TEPCO and the representative of the Fukushima Revitalization Headquarters.

Dr. Dale Klein discussed the activity plan of TEPCO’s Decommissioning Company, to be established on April 1, and the fuel debris removal plan with an officer of TEPCO’s Decommissioning department on March 11, 2014.

Dr.Dale Klein did a speech at Foreign Press Center Japan on March 11, 2014

Securing Japan’s Energy Future after Fukushima:
Talented, Trained People Will Make it Happen



March 11, 2014
Dr. Dale Klein

Good morning, everyone, thank you very much for coming today. As I think you know, I’ve spent quite a bit of time in Japan over the last few years, and I have come to feel very close to this country and to the Japanese people. I have been fortunate enough to work closely with TEPCO’s leadership and many other individuals in my capacity as chairman of the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, and prior to that, when I was with the U.S. government, I developed many fruitful relationships with my counterparts here.


Beyond the hospitality that has been extended to me, and the personal relationships we have developed, I have been impressed by the determination of the Japanese people to meet and overcome the terrible loss from the Great Japan Earthquake and tsunami, and the challenge posed by the accident at Fukushima Daiichi.


At TEPCO, from the most senior executive to individual workers, one cannot but be impressed by their commitment not only to recovery but also to building a better, safer future.


So, even as we mark the third anniversary of the Fukushima accident and reflect on the intervening years, it is that future that I want to especially focus on, as well as the people who are so determined to make it happen. They will continue to face many challenges, and as some recent experiences demonstrate, improvements must continue to be made. But it is a future about which I am optimistic, in part because of the changes I have seen at TEPCO, but even more because of the growing recognition I have seen on the part of Japan’s people that nuclear-generated power must remain a part of Japan’s future.


A Japan that tries to survive without nuclear energy would not be the Japan of today, and certainly would not be the thriving, growing, environmentally responsible Japan that we all want to see tomorrow.


And we do want to see Japan succeed. I can tell you from my many discussions with others in the U.S., and with my colleagues from other countries such as Lady Barbara Judge, who is the deputy chair of our Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, that the world is watching.


And it wants you to succeed because people understand that if we are to successfully manage climate change and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, nuclear power will be an important part of the mix. But they also know that public confidence in that nuclear power can be enhanced, or diminished, by what happens here.


Progress at Fukushima


There has been great progress on many fronts at Fukushima Daiichi over these last three years.


The hastily assembled emergency methods that were being used to cool reactors in the immediate aftermath of the accident have given way to safer and more robust systems. The safe removal of fuel from the spent fuel pool at Unit 4 was made possible by a combination of innovative design and meticulous execution by the workers of TEPCO and its partners.


Progress has been made in getting our arms around the main challenge posed by Fukushima: removal of the once-molten fuel from Units 1, 2, and 3. And they are making progress, though not yet enough, on the long-term challenge posed by groundwater. I remain concerned about the technical talent to manage the water issues and the lack of a long-term plan for the disposition of the filtered water currently stored in the tanks at Fukushima. Of all of the many issues facing us, this is perhaps the simplest to solve but creates the most public anxiety.


With all the recent focus on the management of contaminated water, and the day-to-day ups and downs of water leaks, there is a tendency to divert attention – and resources – from addressing and solving the main challenge posed at Fukushima: How do we keep the molten fuel and the spent fuel cooled and how do we safely remove molten fuel from damaged containment vessels? As most of you know, removing the kind of molten fuel that exists at Fukushima Daiichi has never been done before. At Three Mile Island, the fuel melted but the containment vessel was not breached.


And at Chernobyl, where there was no containment vessel for that graphite reactor, the Soviets just built a concrete sarcophagus around it and essentially walked away.


I do not believe that Japan will walk away from Fukushima. Everything I have learned about your values, your commitment to the environment, and your determination to meet this challenge tells me this. Success will come as the result of many small learnings, and through the persistence of many individuals acting together. We are seeing those incremental learnings now.


Through the use of robotic cameras and other high technology, and with participation of its international partners, TEPCO is learning more about the condition and location of the fuel, the condition of the containment vessels, and this will eventually lead to the development of a strategy for removing that fuel. In its new business plan, TEPCO has set a goal of removing the fuel from at least one of the three reactors by the first half of FY2020. That is six years away, yet it is an ambitious goal given the fact that no one has ever faced such a challenge before.


So the progress being made there now, incremental as it may be, is very important.


I am encouraged by the decision TEPCO has taken to create a distinct entity focused exclusively on the decontamination and decommissioning work at Fukushima. As TEPCO President Hirose has said, this will provide for greater focus on Fukushima, it will provide for greater accountability, and it will incorporate at high-levels organizations like Hitachi and Toshiba that have broad technical resources and a considerable stake in a successful outcome.


I believe it also demonstrates that TEPCO recognizes that the talents, skills and organizational structure for D&D work are not necessarily the same as those needed to run a power company. So much of what the D&D team will encounter will be things no one has ever encountered before, and it will require people with a wide range of technical abilities, diagnostic skills, and critical thinking ability. It is essential that TEPCO staff the new entity with people who have those attributes, and if you do not find the necessary technical talent in Japan that you look world-wide for the necessary talent to do it right and to do it safely.


Safety Culture


Of course, even the most successful cleanup work at Fukushima will not by itself restore the future of nuclear energy – and with it, Japan’s energy and economic future. While continued safe progress at Fukushima is vital to restoring public confidence, it cannot by itself restore Japan’s other 50 or so nuclear power stations to again operate (and, not coincidentally, put back into standby the old fossil fuel burning plants pressed into service in their place).


For that, it will be necessary to ensure that nuclear facilities like TEPCO’s Kashiwazaki-Kariwa facility and others like it can be operated with a very high margin of safety.


I have visited KK and reviewed in depth the safety enhancements that have been made there, and I must say they are impressive. They include greater redundancy in the methods to keep cooling water on the spent fuel pools and reactor cores in the event of a failure, more robust capabilities in the event of an electrical blackout, more portable emergency equipment.


They even include providing for gravity-fed water from a lake in the mountain, in the event power to the pumps fails. These, and other enhancements, represent what we refer to as “defense in depth.”


But the most important changes go beyond these physical enhancements, important as they are. They are the changes in people’s attitudes and behaviors that, taken together, constitute a “safety culture.” And it is the creation of this “safety culture” within TEPCO that has been perhaps the greatest focus of our Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee. The Japanese members of the Nuclear Reform Committee have been very helpful in providing suggestions for improvement.


I’m often asked, “what do you mean by ‘safety culture?’ Do you mean that TEPCO didn’t have safety manuals, or rules, or that they didn’t care about safety?” It’s a good question. Of course TEPCO had manuals, and rules, and it’s clear to me that they care about their people’s safety.


But what we mean by “safety culture” is more than that. It is a greater emphasis on training and having a questioning attitude. Especially, it is a greater emphasis on communication within the organization, not just from the top down but even more from the bottom up and among all the employees.


It is quite literally a culture, one in which we want every worker to come to work every day thinking of safety in everything they do.


It is this kind of culture that I believe TEPCO did not pay enough attention, and which it is now building.


Let me give you an example: In 2008, engineers at Fukushima Daiichi came up with a hypothetical tsunami of 16 meters, and management said the idea was not credible. To be fair, so did just about everyone else. And so, as a result, some precautions weren’t taken against flooding the emergency generators.


Had those precautions been taken – perhaps moving those generators out of the basement, or augmenting them with another line of defense – history might have been very different.


Now, it’s fair to ask, how far can you take that? After all, if you had to prepare for every conceivable calamity that might occur to an overanxious mind, you’d never be able to build anything – not just nuclear power plants but other things like airplanes as well.


And it’s also complicated by the fact that the public does tend to overestimate the risks associated with nuclear energy, and underestimate those associated with fossil fuels.


Indeed, that’s why the “culture” part of “safety culture” is so important. There is no precise formula to tell you when you’ve planned sufficiently. Rather, it’s a way of thinking, of critically assessing every risk. You say, “I don’t think this would happen, but if it did, this is what I would do.”


And the key to establishing this culture is people. People who are trained. People who are responsible. People who are motivated. Who think critically. Who are focused on outcomes as well as processes. Who are prepared for the unexpected and empowered to deal with it. Yes, technology will be important but never as important as well trained people. For every robot there is a person who needs to operate it. But for every valve, every pump, and every switch, there have to be people who understand what each one means to plant safety and operation. In the end, it is the people who will make the difference, technology will only help them do their jobs better.


TEPCO is making substantial progress toward the creation of this culture. It doesn’t happen overnight, and old habits can be hard to overcome. But I believe TEPCO’s leadership is committed to making it happen, and that they understand the necessity of succeeding. I am encouraged by the fact that their Nuclear Reform Plan incorporates extensive changes in management structure as well as training and communications, all with the focus on establishing this safety culture.


And I believe we have seen it play out in the meticulous planning for and execution of the fuel removal from Unit 4, despite the dire predictions that so many had made about how it would turn out.


Indeed, I believe that the fuel removal from Unit 4 is a genuine milestone. It represents the first major step in actual removal of nuclear material after the accident, and at the same time demonstrates the extent to which the safety culture is taking hold. I believe we will see that safety culture take root at KK, and that whenever Japan decides it is an appropriate time to restart KK, we will see it take root as KK and Japan’s other nuclear plants reclaim their crucial role in powering Japan’s economy and its way of life.


World is Watching


As a former U.S. nuclear regulator, and now as the associate vice chancellor for research at the University of Texas System, I travel extensively. Everywhere I go, whether in the U.S., Asia, Europe – truly, wherever – I am asked about Fukushima.


“How are they doing?” “Can they fix it?” “Have they got it under control.” People are intensely interested; some of them are sophisticated nuclear engineers, others are ordinary citizens.


And I tell them the same thing I am telling you: great progress is being made, I am optimistic about the future, but it will not be a straight line forward and there will be setbacks along the way.


At Fukushima, difficult decisions remain to be made about what to do with the 400 tons of contaminated water that are accumulating daily on the site, and inevitably more difficult decisions will need to be made about dealing with the debris of Units 1, 2 and 3. In the coming decades, we will surely encounter the unexpected more than once, and by creating the new D&D entity – and adopting the safety culture – TEPCO is establishing a robust structure that will be able to cope effectively when things don’t go strictly according to plan.


It is important for Japan to realize there will be future problems as the cleanup progresses – what is important is that there is the technical talent and the safety culture to address these problems.


I noted before that the world is watching, and that is true. But it is doing more than watching, it is helping. I have found my work on the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee to be among the most rewarding of my career. We are aware of how important this work is, and how much it means to the people of Japan.


We have been gratified by the reception we have been given and by the openness of our colleagues at TEPCO to true reform and especially the contribution of the members of the Nuclear Reform Committee from Japan. The Nuclear Reform Committee has not always been kind in our assessments, and we intend to continue to offer our thoughts on how things can be improved.


We will continue to provide whatever assistance we can in the coming years, and I am confident that the Japanese people have the resources, technical sophistication, and determination to succeed.


But even as we help, we are also learning. We are learning about how to make nuclear power plants even safer than they already are. And we are learning invaluable lessons about D&D work that will be useful in the coming decades as older nuclear power plants must be retired or replaced.


Even though we hope those retirements will not come as the result of the kind of accident experienced at Fukushima, the technical and engineering experience gained at Fukushima will make a huge contribution to the safe closure of those plants.


Indeed, it is reasonable to believe that the D&D capability you are developing will become a valuable and exportable asset for Japan.


The world, not just Japan, needs nuclear energy as part of the overall mix of sources of our electricity. It makes little sense to have “green” cars, or “green” electric trains if we pollute the air with tons of carbon emissions to generate the electricity they will need. Renewables are important, but Japan and other countries need a reliable supply of base load electricity. As you know, significant numbers of people who once opposed nuclear power now support it precisely because they recognize that the risks of dependence on fossil fuels are so much greater.


Japan’s success in overcoming the challenges of Fukushima will play an important role in building public confidence all over the world in the role of nuclear energy in our common future. So we are cheering for your success.


In a speech a few weeks ago, TEPCO President Hirose noted that the third anniversary of the Fukushima accident marks a time both of reflection on the past and of rededication to creating a better future. I believe he is exactly right.


It is an appropriate time to pause and reflect on the suffering and dislocation visited on so many people by the earthquake, the tsunami, and the accident at Fukushima Daiichi. It is also an appropriate time to reflect on the last three years, which, whatever their frustrations and occasional setbacks, have brought important progress.


And it is an appropriate time to rededicate ourselves to the future. It is a future I believe is bright, and one with energy security and economic vitality for the Japanese people.


No matter how much we rely on process and technology, it is people who will be responsible for achieving these goals. TEPCO will have challenges ahead and there will be setbacks. It is important that TEPCO continues to reform, does not become complacent and continues to make progress on the Fukushima Daiichi clean-up. And I have every confidence that the people of this extraordinary nation will meet that challenge.


At every crucial moment they have done so, and I believe they will continue to do so, through the combination of great effort, teamwork, and technical sophistication for which Japan is renowned. It has been, and remains, a great privilege to have been invited to play a small role in this great national effort.


Thank you.


Dr. Dale Klein visited Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 10, 2014.

  • Dr. Dale Klein visited Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and received explanations on the progress of decommissioning work and countermeasures for contaminated water.
  • After the site visit, Dr. Klein briefed the staff and workers of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The following is an overview of the briefing.
  • ①The world is watching the decommissioning work done at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. I hope you all perform the work safely and with precision.
  • ②If you find a way to implement the work more efficiently or easily, please don’t hesitate to inform your superior.
  • ③TEPCO will surely encounter the unexpected more than once along the way during decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. I hope you overcome any difficulties and establish the world’s leading decommissioning skills.
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Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on January 23, 2014 and Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on the next day with TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Special Task Force

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE and Mr. Masafumi Sakurai received a progress report on the "Nuclear Safety Reform Plan" from TEPCO's Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on December 16, 2013 with TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Office

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations from each member of the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office on the status of progress in the approximately half a year since its establishment.
  • Lady Barbara Judge’s assessment was as follows:
  • ①It is a significant accomplishment that the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office has become a department respected by everyone in TEPCO in less than half a year.
  • ②While TEPCO has been changing so that it puts safety ahead of efficiency, the issue now is how to inculcate this culture in all TEPCO staff. It is important to make improvements in the culture, with the assent of on-site staff, by confirming repeatedly whether all staff understands the meaning and necessity of safety culture and the Nuclear Safety Reform Plan.
  • ③I’d like you to push on and inculcate a safety culture in TEPCO.
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Mr. Lake Barrett, an “International and Decommissioning” member, participated in TEPCO’s “Contaminated Water and Tank Countermeasures Headquarters” press conference on November 13, 2013.

    The main comments offered by Mr. Barrett at the press conference are presented below.
  • I found the preparations for carrying out spent fuel removal from Unit 4 to be safe, confirming the status via documents and on-site inspection.
  • I told the on-site staff that the most important thing when working on-site is a "safety culture".
  • The most important thing when the staff removes the fuel is to work by following the procedure manual.
  • With regard to countermeasures for contaminated water, managing cooling water for a reactor core is the most important aspect. In order to manage water in situations involving several different concentrations of contamination, a written manual is indispensable.
  • I think that water containing tritium will likely be released into the sea at some point. When that time comes, TEPCO has to do so in consideration of national sentiment.
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Mr. Lake Barrett, an “International and Decommissioning” member, conducted an on-site inspection of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on November 13, 2013.

  • Mr. Barrett conducted an on-site inspection after receiving reports from TEPCO staff on the preparations for spent fuel removal from Unit 4 and measures for contaminated water.
  • Barrett3
  • Barrett4
  • See other photos

Mr. Lake Barrett, an “International and Decommissioning” member, discussed the activities of decommissioning and countermeasures for contaminated water on November 12, 2013.

    The main comments offered by Mr. Barrett are presented below.
  • Before officially announcing the commencement of fuel removal, it is important to confirm that the fuel removal plan is based on the reviews from inside and outside of TEPCO and that the appropriate officers have approved it.
  • To tackle the contaminated water issue, TEPCO has to formulate an integrated contaminated water management plan from a strategic perspective, rather than tackle individual incidents in a haphazard way.
  • Barrett1
  • Barrett2

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai conducted an on-site inspection of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station on October 5, 2013

  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai received reports from the Plant Chief and other staff members of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station on the safety measures for facilities and management implemented since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, whilst viewing the areas himself.
  • He commented, "Regarding the Nuclear Safety Reform Plan, I can see steady progress on the safety measures for facilities. However, I think TEPCO needs to make some progress on the management measures. To enhance the measures, as an example, I'd like TEPCO to conduct drills in various situations, such as darkness or snow".
  • sakurai_1
  • sakurai_2

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held meetings on October 4 and 11, 2013 with TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Special Task Force

  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai received a progress report on the "Nuclear Safety Reform Plan".

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai inspected a TEPCO drill conducted on September 27, 2013

  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai inspected a TEPCO drill conducted by TEPCO's Emergency Response Headquarters and Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station following the previous drill conducted in May this year.
  • He commented, "Compared to the previous TEPCO drill (conducted in May, 2013), there have been some improvements owing to the drills. However, more difficult and complex situations may occur. TEPCO needs to expose such unfavorable conditions, considering not only the physical aspects, but also the psychological effects on local people".
  • sakurai

Lady Barbara Judge met with members of the Japanese and international media on October 12, 2013

October 12, 2013-Visiting Tokyo, Lady Barbara Judge CBE, Deputy Chairman of TEPCO's Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee met with members of the Japanese and international media to share her experience as chairman of the United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Authority in creating a strong nuclear safety culture.

In response to questions from the media about the UK decommissioning experience, Lady Judge noted that the British government had created a Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) to oversee all of the country's civil nuclear decommissioning. While a direct copy of the UK model is not appropriate for Japan, she said there may be learning from the NDA which are useful to TEPCO.

She further noted however that the UK experience, which recognizes the need for greater specialization in nuclear decommissioning, could be borrowed and adapted for Japanese needs, and that TEPCO could consider creating a specific subsidiary or division to specialize in decommissioning activities. As decommissioning and power generation require different skill-sets, TEPCO would need to employ foreign and domestic decommissioning experts working alongside its existing employees in this new division. Increased specialization and management oversight would allow for a stronger safety culture in both operations and decommissioning.

Looking to the future, Lady Judge made comments to the press that in her view Japan needed nuclear power as part of its overall energy mix due to natural resource constraints and the need for greater independence from foreigh energy imports. She pointed out that Japan had some of the world's best nuclear technology and that the learning from Fukushima would inform and guide the creation of world-class safety standards.


Dr. Dale Klein attended the meeting of Contaminated Water and Tank Countermeasures Headquarters sponsored by TEPCO on September 13, 2013

  • The president's opening address
(Mr. Hirose)
I sincerely apologize for the challenges we have created with the contaminated water and tank issue even after two and half years after the accident. Recently, I led the establishment of the Contaminated Water and Tank Countermeasure Headquarters as the chairperson. The contaminated water issue is recognized as a significant management issue, and company-wide efforts will be made to address this issue. There are three main areas that the Contaminated Water and Tank Countermeasure Headquarters will be engaged in. First is the issue with the tanks with a focus on the control and management of tanks. The second is the overall problem of the source of contamination and groundwater for the contaminated water issue. The relationship between the contamination source and groundwater will be clarified and the necessary measures will be fully implemented. The third is regarding the investment of internal resources and the utilization of external expert knowledge. I anticipate that the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee will also address the issues of contaminated water and tanks as a topic as well. We will also strive to resolve this issue with the input of Mr. Lake Barrett, who visited Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station yesterday.
  • The outside experts' comments
(Dr. Klein)
I am looking forward to hearing about the water issue today to get an update. As you know, the reform committee is concerned about the water management issue. I think the good news is the spent fuel pool and the reactor cores are being cooled in safety. So as a former regulator, I think it’s very good for the public to understand that the spent fuel and the reactor cores are well maintained. That being said, the water issue is a serious issue. I am glad that Lake Barrett is here today. Lake Barrett was very instrumental in the Three Mile Island activities, and so we are looking forward to his comments as well.
(Lake Barrett)
First of all I would like to say thank you and thank your staff for very good briefings two days ago and very thorough visit to the site yesterday. I was very impressed with the competence and the capability of all those involved. Their hard work and their diligence on dealing with a very complex matter. Based on my review of the situation there, first of all I am pleased to report that the efforts being taken by the team is containing the significant amounts of radioactivity, and there is really no reason for the public or anyone to be concerned for a public health and safety situation about the water at Fukushima Daiichi. I was pleased to see better integration between the design staffs and the operating staffs to address past issues. And to provide a more comprehensive, integrated water management program for the future. I would recommend efforts not only be for the technical control of the water but also to improve your methods of communicating to the world the situation that is actually there at the site. I believe the dedication of the TEPCO team and the Japanese government in assisting and the international support that is there will provide a much improved water management system in the future, and I look forward in seeing the progress later.

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on August 28, 2013 with TEPCO’s Social Communication Office

  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai received explanations on the status of TEPCO’s Social Communication Office, including how information about the contaminated water issue was being transmitted, from the General Manager and Group Manager of the Social Communication Office.
  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai advised that TEPCO should explain issues clearly so that people can understand the information easily and thoroughly, though he expressed satisfaction that TEPCO has been transmitting information more quickly than ever.

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on July 5, 2013 with TEPCO’s Social Communication Office

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE discussed communication channels, methods and procedures with top officials of the Social Communication Office.
  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE advised that it is of the utmost importance to consider all eventualities that may occur and to be prepared to cope with any such situations.
  • Judge
  • Judge

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on July 4, 2013 with TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Office

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE briefed the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office and listened to their enthusiastic response. The following is an overview of the briefing Lady Barbara Judge CBE presented to the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office.
  • (1)I think the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office consists of intelligent members, with a variety of backgrounds and experience. I’d like you all to lead TEPCO to become the company with the world’s highest safety and technology standards.
  • (2)TEPCO sometimes put efficiency ahead of safety before the Fukushima Daiichi accident occurred. Following the accident, I recognize that TEPCO has been changing so that it puts safety ahead of efficiency. You must all take the initiative and imbue a safety culture throughout the organization.
  • (3)It is important for TEPCO to enhance security standards more quickly than any other company. The Nuclear Safety Office should monitor progress periodically.
  • (4)I’d like you to pay careful attention to detail and perform your work thoroughly.
  • judge
  • judge

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on June 22, 2013, with TEPCO’s Social Communication Office.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE introduced a case example of the U.K. Governmental response to issues surrounding BSE (mad cow disease), and discussed how to communicate such matters to society with top officials of the Social Communication Office.
  • Social Communication Office
  • Social Communication Office

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on June 22, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations on the status of the progress of TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Reform Plan and discussed the present challenges and the best way to handle them.
  • Nuclear Reform Specila Task Force
  • Nuclear Reform Specila Task Force

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on June 22, 2013, with TEPCO’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Office.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations on the status of progress, establishment of necessary measures for operations, and further procedures, from the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office.
  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE expressed some satisfaction at the progress that the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office had achieved a month after its establishment, and discussed the present challenges with its top officials.
  • Nuclear Safety Oversight Office
  • Nuclear Safety Oversight Office

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai inspected a TEPCO drill (loss of power sources drill) on May 22, 2013.

  • Mr. Masafumi Sakurai inspected a TEPCO drill (loss of power sources drill) conducted by TEPCO’s Emergency Response Headquarters and Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant.
  • Reflecting past drills and their challenges, the conditions of the drill were not disclosed in advance, other than some basic accident suppositions, such as the occurrence of an earthquake, inundation from a tsunami, and the loss of all power sources.
  • Mr.Sakurai

Dr. Dale Klein held a meeting (conference call) on May 21, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Dale Klein, Chief of the Task Force Hirose and Chief of the secretariat Anegawa checked the status of the nuclear reforms and held a discussion on the present challenges and the best way to handle them.
  • telephon conference

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on April 26, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations on the status of the establishment of the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office.
  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE and the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force discussed the member organizational structure such as candidate of General Manager, and contents of tasks in precise and specific terms.
  • Lady Judge and the Nuclear Safety Oversight Office

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on April 26, 2013, with TEPCO’s Social Communication Office.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations on the status of the establishment of TEPCO’s Social Communication Office by Deputy Director and Group Managers of the Social Communication Office.
  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE introduced a case example that responded to the America’s crisis management and discussed the establishment of the foundation for the Social Communication Office.
  • Lady Judge and the Social Communication Office

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on April 22, 2013, with the Secretariat of the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee.

  • Mr. Sakurai received explanations on the status of the establishment of TEPCO’s Social Communication Office and Nuclear Safety Oversight Office, and discussed on further monitoring of the status of the TEPCO’s reform.

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on March 15, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai continued his discussions on risk communication and crisis management following the meeting on February 26 with the Task Force.

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on February 26, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai continued his discussions on risk communication and crisis management following the meeting on February 22 with the Task Force.

Mr. Lake Barrett, a member of the “International” subcommittee, held a meeting on February 25 on the decontamination in the Fukushima area and the reactor decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

  • Mr. Lake Barrett received explanations and discussed present challenges and the measures being taken with regards to TEPCO’s decontamination efforts.
  • Mr. Lake Barrett received explanations on the progress of the reactor decommissioning work at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and discussed the present challenges and the best way to handle them.
  • International Subcommiittee Meeting
  • International Subcommiittee Meeting

Mr. Lake Barrett, a member of the “International” subcommittee, conducted an on-site inspection of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station on February 26, 2013.

  • Mr. Lake Barrett received reports from TEPCO on the progress being made to achieve a full recovery and restoration from the Fukushima accident and the recent status of the reactor decommissioning. Following these briefings, Mr. Lake Barrett was escorted into the site to begin his inspection.
  • Fukushima Daiichi NPS
  • Fukushima Daiichi NPS
  • See other photos

Dr. Dale Klein held a meeting on February 24 on the reactor decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

  • Mr. Lake Barrett, a member of the “international” subcommittee and a specialist of the decommissioning, also participated in the meeting.
  • Dr. Dale Klein received explanations on the progress of the reactor decommissioning work at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and discussed the present challenges and the best way to handle them.
  • See other photos

Dr. Dale Klein and Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on February 23 on safety measures at Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

  • Dr. Dale Klein and Lady Barbara Judge CBE received from TEPCO a briefing on the Overview of New Safety Standards (Draft) compiled by the Nuclear Regulation Authority Japan, and the status of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station.

Dr. Dale Klein and Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on February 23 on decontamination in the Fukushima area

  • Dr. Dale Klein and Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations and discussed present challenges and the measures being taken with regards to TEPCO’s decontamination efforts.

Dr. Dale Klein, Lady Barbara Judge CBE, and Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on February 22, on the Nuclear Safety Reform Plan being prepared by TEPCO etc.

  • "Self-regulatory" Subcommittee meeting:
    Lady Barbara Judge CBE received explanations on the progress of TEPCO’s self-regulatory organization from TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Special Task Force and discussed about the design and function of the organization.
  • Other comprehensive meeting:
    Dr. Dale Klein, Lady Barbara Judge CBE, and Mr. Masafumi Sakurai primarily discussed risk-communication, crisis management, and activities to permeate safety culture and its evaluation measures etc. The committee members recommended that TEPCO needed to further consider remediation in the areas of risk communication and crisis management.
  • See other photos

The third Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee Meeting planned to be held on February 23 has been postponed.

  • The details of Reassessment of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and the Nuclear Safety Reform Plan (Final Report)" are still under consideration. The matters are to be further discussed at subcommittee meeting, etc.
  • The date of the third Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee Meeting is to be announced once it is determined.

Lady Barbara Judge CBE and TEPCO Nuclear Special Task Force conducted an on-site inspection of the electric power company in the United Kingdom, and exchanged opinions on the self-regulatory organization on January 31 to February 1, 2013.

  • Mr. Alan Rae, a member of the “Self-regulatory” subcommittee, also participated in the meeting.
  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE and TEPCO Nuclear Special Task Force conducted an on-site inspection of Oldbury nuclear power stations.
  • They received the explanations from the site engineers, a board member and managers in charge of the Engineering Department and the Nuclear Safety Assurance Division as a self regulatory organization.
  • Oldbury NPS
  • Magnox

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a roundtable meeting with TEPCO’s female employees working in Fukushima area at the Fukushima Revitalization Headquarters on January 26, 2013.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a roundtable meeting with 5 female employees who were engaged in work related to radiation protection management, emergency planning, industrial safety and reactor maintenance and general affairs at the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power stations, Fukushima Daiichi Stabilization Center etc.
  • The following is a dictation of the opening words of encouragement Lady Barbara Judge CBE presented to TEPCO’s female employees;
  •  I’m Barbara and it is a great pleasure to be here to see such elegant, beautiful, and brilliant women sitting across the table. I am by training a lawyer and I have been in a number of businesses but for the last more than 10 years I’ve been in the nuclear field.
  •  I’ve been chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and after that I’ve been at advising a number of governments on building nuclear power plants and decommissioning them.
  •  Although I have lived in London for the past 20 years, I have worked as Chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. When I was younger living in America, I was a Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, SEC. So I worked with the government for a long time. I’m also a mother. I have one son, who is getting older now and is about to be married next summer. I hope to be a grandmother soon. So I want to say one more thing. You are a dream come true. Because my mother worked as dean in a College until she was 87 years old. And she believed that women should work. Not just because they needed to or they were alone or they were poor, but because they had a brain and they should use it and they should be independent. She used to teach young women to go to work. So for me to see women who are working in the nuclear field is a dream come true. Especially because people think it’s a man’s business. And it’s an honor for me to representative women on this committee, the nuclear monitoring committee for TEPCO, and to see the TEPCO women who are real heroes, some of the real heroes of Fukushima and of the restoration activities that you are doing here. So I am particularly honored to be here on a day when I learned so much about all the efforts TEPCO is expending to make sure Fukushima and the power plants get to the highest safety standards.
  •  And I know now that you are very much an important part of the team in those high standards. And that TEPCO is very proud to have women in such senior and important positions. Because I have often said that woman should be represented in the nuclear field. So now I would like to meet you and learn more about you.

Lady Barbara Judge CBE conducted an on-site inspection of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station on January 26, 2013.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received reports from TEPCO on the progress being made to achieve a full recovery and restoration from the Fukushima accident. Following this briefing, Lady Barbara Judge CBE was escorted into the site to begin her inspection.
  • See other photos

Lady Barbara Judge CBE conducted an on-site inspection of Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station on January 25, 2013.

  • Lady Barbara Judge CBE received a briefing on the physical layout of the power station as well as a report on the progress of the safety measures being implemented based on the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.
  • Following the briefing, Lady Barbara Judge CBE was escorted into the site to inspect the tide embankments, the tide barriers under construction and the newly constructed water reservoir used to secure a stable supply of freshwater. The anti-seismic building and other related facilities were also inspected.
  • Feedback from Lady Barbara Judge CBE after the inspection
  • ○ In order to proceed with an effective observation of TEPCO's nuclear reforms as a deputy chairman of the Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee, I thought it necessary to pay a direct visit to the nuclear power station.
  • ○ Progress is being made on the implementation of measures to enhance safety.
  • ○ I have inspected many different power stations. However, I have never felt as safe as I did here.
  • ○ I'm sure that TEPCO has implemented every measure that can be taken. It was most reassuring to see and verify the various safety measures being taken such as the embankments, the water reservoir as well as the related safety measures being implemented at the building site.
  • ○ I am very impressed by the efforts that TEPCO is putting forth to achieve the highest global standards in safety.
  • ○ I appreciate TEPCO for giving a good opportunity to see their best efforts to overcome the difficult issues.

Dr. Kenichi Ohmae held a meeting on January 11, 2013, with the TEPCO Nuclear Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Kenichi Ohmae discussed the statement (proposal, recommendation) which he declared in the second nuclear monitoring committee with the Task Force.

A committee member-only meeting was held on December 14, 2012.

  • The members reported on the work of their respective subcommittees and discussed the direction the committee will take going forward.
  • December 14, 2012
  • December 14, 2012

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on December 11, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai received an explanation from the Task Force about TEPCO's nuclear safety reforms plan (interim report).

Dr. Kenichi Ohmae held a meeting on December 7, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Ohmae received an explanation from the Task Force about the TEPCO's nuclear safety reforms plan (interim report).
  • He also continued his discussions regarding the following four tasks he pointed out to TEPCO on October 24 (technical aspects).
  • (1) Verification of safety design at the time of construction
  • (2) Verification of the reasons why U.S. anti-terrorism measures (B5b) were not implemented
  • (3) Discussion comparing the proposals in the Ohmae Report (lessons and countermeasures) and TEPCO's views and countermeasures
  • (4) Verification of the appropriateness of post-accident releases of information

Dr. Dale Klein held a meeting on November 30, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Klein received an explanation from the Task Force about the TEPCO's nuclear safety reforms plan (interim report). He also discussed the following two points.
  • (1) Instilling of safety culture
  • (2) TEPCO's international track record (attendance at international conferences, etc.) (international aspects)

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on November 29, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai discussed the following two points with the Task Force (crisis management and ethical aspects).
  • (1) Success factors in dealing with the accident at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station
  • (2) Preventing organization from becoming a ceremonial affair in time of crisis

Dr. Kenichi Ohmae held a meeting on November 23, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Ohmae continued his discussions with the Task Force regarding the following four tasks he pointed out to TEPCO on October 24 (technical aspects).
  • (1) Verification of safety design at the time of construction
  • (2) Verification of the reasons why U.S. anti-terrorism measures (B5b) were not implemented
  • (3) Discussion comparing the proposals in the Ohmae Report (lessons and countermeasures) and TEPCO's views and countermeasures
  • (4) Verification of the appropriateness of post-accident releases of information

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai conducted an on-site inspection of the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station on November 13, 2012.

  • Mr. Sakurai received an explanation from the power plant's chief on the station's response in the wake of the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake.
  • November 13, 2012
  • November 13, 2012

Lady Barbara Judge CBE held a meeting on November 9, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Lady Judge received an explanation from the Task Force regarding the details about the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident and a progress update on the nuclear safety reforms plan.
  • She also introduced the Task Force to the British model of a self-regulating organization (self-regulating aspect).

Dr. Kenichi Ohmae held a meeting on November 7, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Ohmae continued his discussions with the Task Force regarding the following four tasks he pointed out to TEPCO on October 24 (technical aspects).
  • (1) Verification of safety design at the time of construction
  • (2) Verification of the reasons why U.S. anti-terrorism measures (B5b) were not implemented
  • (3) Discussion comparing the proposals in the Ohmae Report (lessons and countermeasures) and TEPCO's views and countermeasures
  • (4) Verification of the appropriateness of post-accident releases of information

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on November 5, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai discussed the following two points with the Task Force.
  • (1) Verification of the accident response at the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station (crisis management aspect)
  • (2) Preventing the nuclear safety reforms plan from fading away (ethical aspect)

Mr. Masafumi Sakurai held a meeting on October 30, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Mr. Sakurai directed that information be provided on the following two points to the Task Force.
  • (1) Status of investigations into disaster prevention and crisis management (crisis management aspect)
  • (2) Changes in employee awareness prior to and after 3/11 and internal reporting (ethical aspect)

Dr. Kenichi Ohmae held a meeting on October 24, 2012, with the TEPCO Nuclear Reform Special Task Force.

  • Dr. Ohmae directed the Task Force to engage in the following four tasks (technical aspect).
  • (1) Verification of safety design at the time of construction
    What kinds of explanations were given to local residents about the safety of nuclear reactors at the time (about 45 years prior) when Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was constructed? Also investigate and verify whether or not safety provisions operated at the time of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.
  • (2) Verification of the reasons why U.S. anti-terrorism measures (B5b) were not implemented
    Investigate and verify the reasons why U.S. anti-terrorism measures (B5b) were not implemented as a measure for dealing with a station blackout (SBO), one of the root causes of the Fukushima Daiichi accident.
  • (3) Do a study comparing the proposals in the Ohmae Report (lessons and countermeasures) with TEPCO's views and countermeasures, and clarify those places where they are not in accord
    Compare and verify the recommendations contained in the "What Do We Learn from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station?" (referred to hereafter as the Ohmae Report) that Dr. Ohmae released in October 2011 based on a causal analysis of the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the countermeasures undertaken by TEPCO.
  • (4) Verification of the appropriateness of post-accident releases of information
    Investigate and verify whether the information that TEPCO released after 3/11 was, based on present understandings, repeatedly correct or incorrect.

Dr. Dale Klein conducted an on-site inspection of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station on October 11, 2012.

  • October 11, 2012
  • October 11, 2012

Dr. Dale Klein conducted an on-site inspection of the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power stations on October 10, 2012.

  • October 10, 2012
  • October 10, 2012